Universal Norms in a Time of Sovereigntism

― Issue 1(17), 2021

Mikhail Minakov

UNIVERSAL NORMS IN A TIME OF SOVEREIGNTISM.
INTRODUCTION   PDF

4

THEMATIC ARTICLES

Theoretical issues

Yurii Mielkov

FROM NATION STATE TO HUMAN PERSON:
THE EVOLUTION OF SOVEREIGNTY  PDF

8

Emil Pain

UNIVERSALISM AND SOVEREIGHNTISM:
A PENDULUM MODEL *  PDF  

22

Ruslan Zaporozhchenko

SOVEREIGNTISM AS A VOCATION AND PROFESSION:
IMPERIAL ROOTS, CURRENT STATE, POSSIBLE PROSPECTS  PDF

44

Oleksandr Fisun &
Nataliya Vinnykova

DE-ETATIZATION OF STATE SOVEREIGNTY
AND FORMATION OF GLOBAL “MAIDAN” PDF

72

Mikhail Minakov

THE SOVEREIGNTIST TURN: SOVEREIGNTY
AS A CONTESTED CONCEPT AGAIN PDF

87

Gulnara Shaikhutdinova

SOVEREIGNTISM AND NATIONALISM: CONSEQUENCES
FOR THE FRAGMENTATION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW    PDF

115

Volodymyr Fadieiev

BEYOND THE NATIONAL: THE SOCIAL IMAGINARY
AND COSMOPOLITANISM **   PDF

131

Case Studies

Boyka Stefanova

SOVEREIGNTISM MEETS POST-WESTPHALIAN SOVEREIGNTY: THE EU EXPERIENCE  PDF

168

Maria Snegovaya

GUNS TO BUTTER: SOCIOTROPIC CONCERNS
AND FOREIGN POLICY PREFERENCES IN RUSSIA *   PDF

182

Andreas Umland

POST-SOVIET UKRAINIAN RADICAL SOVEREIGNTISM
IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE: ULTRANATIONALIST PARTIES AND ETHNOCENTRIC UNCIVIL SOCIETY *  PDF 

202

Oksana Dufeniuk

THE ECHR IMPACT ON THE FORMATION
OF SUPRANATIONAL AND NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS PARADIGM (UKRAINIAN CONTEXT) **   PDF

232

Sergey Shenin

NATO AND A CONFLICT BETWEEN SOVEREIGNTISM
AND UNIVERSALISM *  PDF

251

Viktor Koziuk

IS A CENTRAL BANK’S INDEPENDENCE DOOMED
IN A TIME OF POPULISM? SOVEREIGNTISM
VS INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY **   PDF

275

DISCUSSIONS AND BOOK REVIEWS

Dmytro Khutkyy

HOW VAST OR HOW GOOD IS E-DEMOCRACY? A REVIEW ON THE “DIGITAL DEMOCRACY DATABASE” BY THE EUROPEAN DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE   PDF

302

Iryna Polets

BOOK REVIEW: Ostap Kushnir. (2020). Business, Values, and EU’s Response to Protests in Ukraine. Cases from 2003–04, 2010, and 2013–14. Warsaw: Lazarski University Press  PDF

305

Yevhen Mahda

A TIMELY IDEA. BOOK REVIEW: Zmitser Lukashuk and Maxim Gariunou. (2020). Belaruskaia natsyanalnaia ideia: shto takoe Belarus I hto takiia belarusy: vosemdzesiat piats karotkih interviiu [from Bel.: The Belarusian national idea: what is Belarus and what do Belarusians want: eighty-five short interviews]. Minsk:  Medysont **   PDF

309

Ihor Il’iushyn

BOOK REVIEW: Roman Ponomarenko (2018). Galyts’ki dobrovol’chi polki SS 1943–1944. Istoriia bez prykras. [from Ukr.: Galician SS Volunteer Regiments 1943–1944. History without Pretties].Ternopil’: Mandrivets’ *   PDF

312

Dmitry Gorin

PARTING WAYS OF MODERNITY: LIFE-WORLDS, MODERNIZATION, AND DEMODERNIZATION. BOOK REVIEW: Mikhail Minakov. (2020). Dialektika sovremennosti v Vostochnoi Evrope. Opyt sotsialno-filosofskogo osmysleniia [from Rus.: Dialectics of the Eastern European modernity. A social-philosophical reflection]. Kiev: Laurus *  PDF

317

Mikhail Lipkin

BOOK REVIEW: Serhiy Hirik (ed.). Ievreiy Ukraiiny: Revoliutsiia i pisliarevoliutsiina modernizatsiia. Polityka. Kultura. Suspilstvo [from Ukr.: The Jews of Ukraine: Revolution and post-revolutionary modernization. Politics, culture, society]. Київ: Laurus, 2018 *   PDF

321

The entire issue can be downloaded HERE.
________________________________________

* — full-text article is in Russian

** — full-text article is in Ukrainian

 

Call for submissions

Ideology and Politics Journal―Calls for papers:

issue 3, 2021 — Social and Political Transformations in the Middle East and Northern Africa Region

issue 2, 2021 — The Soviet and Post-Soviet Law: The Failed Transition from Socialist Legality to the rule of law state



issue 3, 2021 — Social and Political Transformations in the Middle East and Northern Africa Region

The Ideology and Politics Journal (IPJ) aims to develop an interdisciplinary platform for debates of informed and non-partisan researchers in the fields of political science, sociology, political economy, social philosophy, intellectual history, and cultural studies. Devoted to the advancement of the understanding of socio-political processes in contemporary societies around the world, the IPJ publishes special issues aimed at specific regions. In 2021, the chosen region is the Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA).

Growing instability and rapid volatility are becoming characteristic features of the socio-political development of the MENA, capable of causing a further increase in the revolutionary process and changing the geostrategic position of this region. The events of the Arab Spring and the impact they had on further reconfiguration of the regional order architecture is still one of the most pressing issues on the agenda of the entire world community.

The Arab Spring of 2011 didn’t bring democracy and freedom, prosperity and development. Instead, it exposed even more of deep-rooted divisions in societies throwing the region in disarray prompting old ruling elites to not only face the crisis of their own legitimacy but to address the very consistency of their states and borders, many of which were shaped 100 years ago under Sykes-Picot legacy.

The post-Arab Spring environment opened a new chapter of power competition in the region prompting the West to retreat and rethink their priorities while inviting new players to the field laying ground for a new order to be established. The Arab Spring also marked the beginning of the era of new coalitions in the MENA. In the 2010s, an active process of looking for new allies began, unusual alliances emerge, both economically and politically.

Another important aspect revealed by the Arab Spring is the dead end of the project of political reform based on political Islamism. All this makes one to wonder why the Islamic movements were unable to implement the project of creating an adequate state based on Islamic identity and failed to reveal the ability to cooperate with other political and confessional forces?

In a special issue of Ideology and Politics Journal, we call researchers of social studies, including politics, religions and international relations of the MENA to submit their articles devoted to these regional transformations. In particular, we seek to address the following aspects of this overarching topic:

  • The MENA societies in the 21st century: collapse of the Sykes-Picot system and emergence of the MENA’s new security architecture
  • Transformation of the political systems after the Arab Spring: does democracy have a future in MENA?
  • Erosion of a social contract after the Arab Spring
  • Ideological transformations and ideological innovations in the MENA countries after the Arab Spring
  • Secular liberal agenda in the MENA region: a fantasy or a viable solution?
  • Long-term democratic solutions in the post-Arab Spring environment
  • Future of the political Islam

Articles submitted to the issue are expected to address the proposed topic from the perspectives of legal theory and philosophy, history of law, constitutional law, and political science. Comparative and interdisciplinary studies are welcome.

Articles in English with not less than seven thousand words each should be sent to the e-mail addresses of Leonid Issaev (at: lisaev@hse.ru) and Iliya Kusa (at: iliya.kusa.uif@gmail.com).

We will accept to the review only those articles that will have been submitted before midnight of June 15, 2021. The IPJ issue 3 (2021) will be published no later than December 31, 2021.

All articles submitted to the IPJ are subject to double-blind peer review, which results in a decision on publication. Review and publication in Ideology and Politics Journal is free of charge. For more about the terms of publication of articles see: https://www.ideopol.org/instructions-for-authors/. By submitting an article for the IPJ review, the author agrees to all the terms of cooperation between the authors and the IPJ editorial board specified in this section.

The editors of the issue are

  • Leonid Issaev (HSE University, Moscow, Russia) and
  • Iliya Kusa (Ukrainian Institute for the Future, Kyiv, Ukraine).

The editor-in-chief of Ideology and Politics is Mikhail Minakov (Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars).

Submission guidelines can be seen here: https://www.ideopol.org/instructions-for-authors/

More on the IPJ can be seen here: https://www.ideopol.org/about-journal/



issue 2, 2021 — The Soviet and Post-Soviet Law: The Failed Transition from Socialist Legality to the rule of law state

In post-Soviet theory and philosophy of law, the Soviet period is usually described as a period of “anti-law.” This perception was the starting point for the construction of a “real” legal system that would need to be free of such legacy. The Soviet legal tradition has thus been seen as the “Other” that has to be rejected in favor of the doctrine of Rechtsstaat / Rule of Law. On these ideological premises, the post-Soviet legal systems were largely built.

The real state of affairs, however, seems to be more complicated. On the one hand, it is now obvious that the post-Soviet republics have failed to achieve the goal stated in the early 1990s —to establish liberal democracy based on the rule of law. Moreover, since the 2000s, many states have abandoned this goal, referring to their special historical path, the alienness of Western legal values, difficult geographical and geopolitical position, etc.

It is noteworthy that the reception by these legal systems of liberal legal values, doctrines, and institutions, such as human dignity and rights, constitutional control, judicial independence, and recognition of legal principles as the source of law, has borne unexpected fruit. For example, in the post-Soviet region, the collectivistically argued idea of human dignity can be used to limit fundamental rights, constitutional courts can become a tool for the repudiation of international obligations and decisions of international courts, and the rule of law can serve as a normative basis for ignoring clear and precise legal norms and protecting informal interests of strong political and economic players. Obviously, these problems cannot be explained solely by the negative influence of the Soviet legacy. Many of them in one way or another are related to the specificity of the post-Soviet legal reality.

On the other hand, having proclaimed the rejection of socialist legality in favor of the rule of law, post-Soviet law has not completely lost its ties with Soviet legal tradition. — And here we refer not only to Soviet legislation, which is still in force in some post-Soviet countries, or about hidden citations to the Brezhnev Constitution in several post-Soviet constitutions.

The post-Soviet law seems to have largely retained its commitment to the basic principle of Soviet law: the priority of politics over law when any legal principle, any rule, and the procedure can be ignored if political expediency requires it.

In a special issue of Ideology and Politics Journal, we call to submit articles devoted to the phenomenon of post-Soviet law, including its relationship to the Soviet legal tradition. In particular, we seek to address the following aspects of this overarching topic:

  • How to describe Soviet and post-Soviet law in the language of contemporary philosophy of law?
  • How have Western-origin legal values (human rights, democracy, the rule of law, etc.) been implemented to and utilized in the post-Soviet legal systems?
  • What are the characteristics and specificities of post-Soviet constitutionalism?
  • Law and politics in post-Soviet states;
  • Assessment of the Soviet past and law.

Articles submitted to the issue are expected to address the proposed topic from the perspectives of legal theory and philosophy, history of law, constitutional law, and political science. Comparative and interdisciplinary studies are welcome.

Articles in English, Russian, or Ukrainian with from 5 to 10 thousand words each should be sent to the e-mail address of Dr. Dmytro Vovk at: dmtr.vovk@gmail.com.

We will accept to the review only those articles that will have been submitted before midnight of May 31, 2021.

The IPJ issue 2, 2021 will be published no later than December 1, 2021.

All articles submitted to the IPJ are subject to double-blind peer review, which results in a decision on publication. Review and publication in Ideology and Politics Journal is free of charge. For more about the terms of publication of articles see: https://www.ideopol.org/instructions-for-authors/. By submitting an article for the IPJ review, the author agrees to all the terms of cooperation between the authors and the IPJ editorial board specified in this section.

The editors of the issue are Mikhail Antonov (National Research University “Higher School of Economics”) and Dmytro Vovk (Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University). The editor-in-chief of Ideology and Politics is Mikhail Minakov (Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars).

Submission guidelines can be seen here: https://www.ideopol.org/instructions-for-authors/

More on the IPJ can be seen here: https://www.ideopol.org/about-journal/